Articles from Sharpen Experts

8 Networking Mistakes To Avoid

Networking is  an ability that is learned. Few of us can be said to be born networkers. As to why it is a good idea to learn it, the answer is simple: it can help you immensely in your career. Online networking is simple, there’s no face-to-face communication, people tend to be more relaxed online, and you don’t have to put up with annoying chatterboxes, you can just unfriend them on Facebook, unfollow them on LinkedIn, or delete them from your Skype address book.   Offline networking, however, is different. It can be much more useful, because you get to physically meet people and make a much stronger impression, but at the same time it can be quite intimidating. The talent of presenting yourself well, says business and big data expert Bernard Marr, is worth acquiring, so you can maximize the benefits of networking events. As part of this acquisition, it pays to know what not to do, so here are eight mistakes that Marr says you should avoid at all costs.   Dropping names.   You may think name-dropping makes for a great confidence boost (it really does) but if you also believe that it can create a favorable impression of you, you’re wrong. Name-dropping will most likely result in your new acquaintances remembering those other people’s names and not yours, which is the opposite of what you are trying to achieve. So, don’t talk about that time you shook hands with Michael Bloomberg himself, talk about how your article got published on Bloomberg.   Throwing cards around.   The exchange of business cards is a classic part of introduction at a networking event. The key word, though, is part, not introduction. Just handing around cards will not improve your chances of a career advancement; people generally tend to forget a face if it’s not accompanied by something else, like a good success story or a catchy business offer or just a nice chat. So, give out your card but take the time to talk to the people as well. It’s about the quality of the contact, not the number of cards you manage to give out.   Giving two cards at a time.   That’s taking the above mistake one step further: handing one person two cards in the hope that s/he would share one of them with someone else of potential use for you. No, they won’t. People don’t like to be treated as means to an end and chances are that both cards will end up in the trash. If you present yourself well, your new acquaintances will volunteer to refer you to other people.   Switching into chatterbox gear.   That’s the other extreme you should avoid at all costs. Small talk works as an icebreaker but if you get too excited (and nervous) you might slip into the direction of spilling your guts about the traffic jam you got stuck on the way here, or how late you stayed after work the other day, or you veer into personal details that your new acquaintances don’t need to hear. Watch how much you talk, basically.   Giving too much information.   The ugly sister of the chatterbox, telling your life story to a stranger, is not the smartest move in networking. Telling someone how you founded your business or started your career and taking them through every little step of your business or professional career can be more than a bit tiresome and will not leave the right impression. Stick to where you are now and where you want to be in the near future.   Getting the handshake wrong.   Not too limp and not too tight, that’s the golden rule. If your handshake is lifeless and apathetic, you’re not sending the right message; you’re telling the person opposite you that you yourself are apathetic and disinterested. On the other hand, if you overdo it, trying to demonstrate how confident and successful you are, you’re likely, again, to miss the target and come across as an overconfident nuisance.   Party-crashing.   Good manners prescribe not to go to a party uninvited. This is also valid for joining other people’s conversations at a networking event. Don’t barge in on a group, wait for someone in that group to acknowledge you, then introduce yourself and join the conversation. In addition to the obvious benefit of demonstrating good manners, this will help you make sure you can actually contribute to the conversation.   Staying online the whole time.   You go to networking events to meet people, not to check your email or browse your Facebook feed. Make the most of the situation by focusing on that very purpose and put your cell phone away. If you are waiting for a very important call, it will come through even if your phone is in your bag or pocket. Focus on making new contacts, that’s what you’re there for.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

10 Questions To Ask Before Starting A Job Hunt

Asking questions is a major part of job hunting, and some of the most important questions to ask are those addressed to yourself, those that would help you arrange your priorities in the right order and make job-seeking more successful. Here are 10 questions, suggested by business and big data expert Bernard Marr, the answers to which should precede any major career change.   Is your current job really that bad?   Sometimes we feel pretty miserable in a job and are basically ready to take anything else just to get out of it. Or your last job was the worst, when you think about it, and you want something completely different. As is the case with most things in life, everything has two sides, even the worst job, such as, say, the security of a paycheck at the very least. So, before you start job-hunting, take the time to list the pros and cons of your last or current job. This will give you a clearer picture of what you are looking for.   Where do you see yourself in five years?   One of the most dreaded questions in a job interview will actually give you the chance to define, or redefine, your own long-term goals. This will help you refine your job search in a very useful way. If, for instance, you’re planning to study for some additional professional qualification, you could concentrate on part-time jobs that don’t require you working 10 hours a day and shun the full-time alternatives. If you want a career in a specialized field, then you’ll be focusing on those jobs that need full commitment.   What makes you happy?   Enjoying your hobby or spending time with the family is a given but there must be something else you also like doing, in your professional field. Knowing what makes you happy is essential in picking the right job postings: knowing you’re applying for a job that will make you happy will help you perform better once you get it, and it could also have a favorable effect on how you do in your interview. We are at our best when we do something we love.   What kind of management do you need?   Some people work much better when they’re under the watchful eye of their direct superior, while others feel much more productive and creative when they are left to move at their own pace and apply their own approach to a project. You need to ask yourself which group you belong to because this will widen (and focus) your perspective on possible jobs you could look for.   How do you like your life?   We all have at least a vague idea about how much time we’re willing to dedicate to work, free time, and family. When mulling over a career change, it’s worth staying on this question for a while, so you don’t end up in a job that, interesting as it may be, is in conflict with your work/life priorities. Not to mention that you won’t be your best self in such a job and you might lose it before you’re prepared to leave it.   What’s your style?   This one is related to what you like to do but focuses on how you do it. If you like, you can think about it in terms of personality types, along the extrovert-introvert axis. For introverts in general, a position in sales or in a call center may not be the best idea since they require constant interaction with clients. At the same time, they could be perfect for extroverts. Know yourself and make your conclusions about which career path will be best suited to your personality, which, alas, we can’t change.   Do you know your strong and weak points?   The strengths and weaknesses question/s is another job interview classic and also one of the questions you should ask yourself before even applying for a job. Why? Because job descriptions can mean very different things, some of which will make that particular job more attractive to you. For instance, if you’re a copywriter and you know that you thrive under pressure, a copywriting position in a small firm may not be your best bet, unless, of course, the small firm is on its way up big time. Knowing what you’re best at will, again, serve to refine your job search.   How willing are you to change?   Some jobs may offer you to do exactly what you’ve dreamed of but do it at the other end of the country. Or across town, which means a much longer commute than your old job. You need to be clear how much you’re willing to sacrifice in terms of personal comfort or place of residence to get that dream job. If changing home will be too stressful, no dream job is worth it, and vice versa, of course.   Do you make a good impression online?   While the questions so far have been internally oriented, now you have to take a look at how others see you. Go through your social network profiles, blogs and any other place you’re regularly active, and try to analyze how your online presence makes you look. Google yourself as well for a fuller picture. If you don’t completely like what you see, change what you can.   How much money do you need?   It’s never just about the money but money is a major factor when making a career change decision. You probably know how much you want to be making (in almost any case more than you are making now right?) and you should compare this to the average for your professional field and also to how much work you’re willing to put into achieving this financial goal. Answering this question could give you some ideas about what kind of work to look for.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

Dos and Don’ts When Asking for a Raise

Good news for everyone who believes they get less than they’re worth: this year the chances of getting a raise are higher than a few years ago, and higher than last year. Just look at the figures – 82% of employers say they are planning salary raises for their current employees, according to CareerBuilder. This compares to 73% last year. So, the chances are good but you can still miss the opportunity if you’re not well prepared, so here are some dos and don’ts when asking for a raise.   Don’t wait for your annual review. Your boss may be overstressed by the amount of reviews they need to make and besides budgets are most probably already allocated by the time annual reviews are discussed. The best time is just after a successfully completed project or when asked to take on new responsibilities.   Don’t complain and threaten. Nobody likes a whiner, so adopting a negative perspective on the situation with your salary is a sure loser. As for threats to leave, they are only acceptable if you are ready to follow through with them. Try to see the situation from your boss’ perspective – will you like the manner in which you’re asking for the raise?   Don’t compare yourself to a co-worker in the same or similar position. Again, this is a negative stance and, besides, your opinion of that co-worker’s responsibilities and achievements may differ from that of the boss.   Don’t start the conversation without careful preparation. This includes finding the average remuneration for your position in the sector, familiarizing yourself with the company’s performance, and rehearsing.   Make sure you avoid all of these mistakes. Now here’s what to do:   Do present evidence. If you want a raise, you have to be able to tell your boss why do you deserve it, using facts. These include successfully completed projects or any benefit for the company that resulted from your efforts. Based on this evidence, present your boss with the figure you have in mind for the raise.   Do focus on your continuing value. This means speaking about the future, not just the past. Highlight some ongoing project or responsibility of yours that is expected to lead to substantial benefits for the company over the next few years. For this, you will need to be aware of the strategic goals of the company and explain how your contribution will help meet them.   Do have a backup plan. If you get a no from your boss for a raise in the size you wanted, and no proposal for a smaller one, ask for a bonus, or another benefit that you have prepared to accept instead of hard cash. You message should be clear: you work hard, bring value to the company and expect matching compensation.   Do rehearse the conversation. Practice will boost your confidence and you will need this confidence when asking for a raise. It will also help you identify potentially weak points in your argument that you can work on until it’s flawless. The stronger argument you make, the better your chances of leaving the meeting with exactly the raise you wanted.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

Why Straight Bragging Is Better Than False Humility

Humblebragging or the tendency to boast about an event or achievement by pretending to complain about it is a common phenomenon online. It’s also common offline as one tactic in the strategy of making a good impression. Harvard Business School professor Francesca Gino says humblebragging is an intuitive way of dealing with two issues at once: hiding an insecurity or a weak point, and highlighting our strong points. Understandably, one of the places where we employ this tactic is the job interview room.   We’ve said before how a lot of, if not most, unprepared job candidates try to mask a strength as a weakness in answer to a question along the lines of “Name your biggest weaknesses.” To check whether this was indeed a successful strategy, Gino and two colleagues decided to test it on 112 students. They hypothesized that honest bragging was a bigger winner than false modesty and their hypothesis was proven by the experiment.   What they did was ask the student to answer that question about the weakness in writing. Most of them, 75%, as expected, chose the humblebragging path. Afterward, they asked two research assistants, who were unaware of the experiment, to review the answers and say which ones sounded like they were honest and which ones were humblebrags. The assistants picked out the honest ones unfailingly. But that wasn’t the end of the experiment. What Gino and her colleagues did then was approach another two research assistants, also unaware of the purpose of the experiment, and ask them which “job candidates” they would hire. The result: they were much less willing to hire the humblebraggers than the honest people.   So, where does this leave the actual job candidates who know they have more than one weakness and are worried that mentioning any would cost them the job? It leaves them in a better position than those who prefer to play it supposedly safe, passing a strength as a weakness. The thing is, says Gino, that sometimes what we intuitively feel is the right approach to a situation turns out to be wrong, and the belief that we can create a positive impression by hiding aspects of our real selves is one of those cases.   Honesty trumps the artificial good impression for another reason as well, Gino adds. Honest people who are willing to admit a weakness are more likely to be seen by the interviewer as open to improvement, and moreover, willing to improve. Admitting a weakness basically means you admit a vulnerability and other people are not so cruel as to fail to acknowledge that and react favorably. So, brag away if you feel you have reason for bragging, and be as modest as you like about the things you truly believe are weaknesses. Hint: workaholism is not a weakness (from an employer’s point of view), and neither is that ever so popular perfectionism most people cite as their ultimate problem in life.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

5 Missteps That Can Cost You the Interview

Interviewers are different and you can never be sure what little quirks they might have that could tip the scales against you. There is no way to prepare for such individual peculiarities but there is a way to prepare for some attitudes that most people share, such as ones regarding punctuality, cleanliness, and politeness. Here are five things you should consider avoiding at all costs, as they could turn the job interview into a waste of time for both you and the interviewer, regardless of your excellent professional credentials.   Don’t be late.   Traffic seems to be horrible around the world nowadays but this is no excuse for arriving late for your interview. Leave the house an hour earlier if you must but be on time. In case you have some sort of family emergency, the decent thing to do would be to call whoever your contact is at the company you’re applying for and give them a heads up. It will be appreciated and it might not affect your chances so dramatically as getting in late.   Look your best.   Another important aspect is your appearance, and this means paying attention to every detail. It would of course be best if you’re familiar with the dress code at the company but even if it’s completely casual, it would be safer to go to your interview not so completely casual, just in case. Opt for a plain T-shirt instead of one with “Keep Calm and Watch Game of Thrones” on it, for example, little things like that. It might turn out the interviewer personally hates the show, you never know. Keep it plain and clean.   Do not be rude.   This should be self-evident but many of us consider their smartphone an extension of their hand and wouldn’t even dream of thinking that it might be rude to check your Gmail inbox while you’re interviewing for a job. Habits can be dangerous and this is one case when they can be very dangerous indeed. Lapsing into monologues and ignoring the interviewer’s attempts to interrupt them is also considered rude, so try to demonstrate your emotional intelligence and don’t turn the interview into an ode to yourself, however confident you are.   Ask what you can give the company, not what you’ll get.   Yes, Kennedy was right when he spoke the words paraphrased above. It makes a poor impression if a job candidate constantly goes on about salary, job security and promotion procedures. It’s clear you will get paid for what you do, and the better you do it, the more secure your job will be as a general rule. Of course, there’s always the danger of another recession but this is out of both your and the company’s control, so there is no point worrying about it excessively and ruining the interview.   Don’t radiate negativity.   OK, you can complain about the traffic at some point, if you’re making small talk, but it’s not a good idea to complain about your last job, your co-workers or your boss. Even if you hated your last job, there is a way to present the information in a more positive way (see our older posts about this). The truth is that nobody likes negative people and sympathy never made someone hire anyone else. So, in case you’re thinking you may improve your chances by detailing at length what hell your previous job was and how hard your life is, you’d better think again.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

Three Tactics to Improve Your Confidence

  It’s no surprise that job interviews are stressful experiences, the reason being that you are not the one in power in these exchanges. What can make things worse is if you really very much want this job. The more you want it, the more stressful the interview would be for you, and this in turn increases your chances of making a wrong move. Luckily, science has given this issue some attention. Here are three tactics you can use prior to the interview to boost your confidence and reduce the inevitable stress, ultimately improving your chances of getting the job.   Be on a first-name basis with yourself.   We all talk to ourselves, not necessarily out loud. If you’re positive in these internal dialogues, then you’re good to go but most of us seem to self-flagellate about this and that when they talk to themselves. This self-flagellation does nothing for confidence but, according to one researcher, psychologist Ethan Kross, you can “psych yourself up” by just changing the perspective and talking to yourself in the second or third person, using your name. This shift in perspective will remove the focus from yourself and you will be able to view yourself in a more distanced, hence more positive way. You would be able to encourage yourself that the interview will go great, just like you would do for a friend.   Write a story about your greatest moment of power.   OK, it doesn’t have to be the greatest, just a moment when you were in a powerful position and it made you feel wonderful about yourself. This is called power-priming and its effect has been researched by Adam Galinsky from Columbia Business School. He says this tactic increases your sense of control over a situation, even one as stressful as a job interview, and control helps you do better. The most important thing to bear in mind when doing this exercise is to go into as much detail as possible, to reinforce the positive effect.   Assume a position of power.   It’s all about power, it seems. The more powerful you feel, the better your control and hence performance. From a purely physical perspective expansive position like the Superman position, for instance, have a really strong effect on how you feel about yourself in terms of confidence. You don’t even have to do it immediately before the interview, inviting raised eyebrows and giggles that could dampen your just-acquired courage, you can do it before leaving your home to go to the interview.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

Networking – The More Efficient Job-Hunting Style

  Traditional job-hunting methods such as browsing databases and sending resumes in bulk are now giving way to other, more flexible and stress-free methods, such as networking. Networking is in any case a part of any job hunt but if you deliberately focus more on it, you might be surprised with the results. According to human resources expert Liz Ryan, job hunting like a CEO is the best way to get your next job. How do CEOs look for jobs? By networking.   The advantage of networking over sending out resumes to a hundred prospective employers is that you can reach not just more people but also more relevant people, the people who actually make the hiring decisions. You may have heard about the Six Degrees of Separation theory and the career field is a very good case in point. Imagine you want to work for a specific company and have wanted to do so for a long time. You have a friend who has a cousin working for that company and through this channel you get to hear about the vacancy even before the company lists the job. This gives you a definite advantage to other candidates because you can apply for the job first. Ryan suggests one way of doing this is with what she calls a pain letter. Or you can simply send your resume before anyone else even hears about the job.   Another, even greater advantage of networking over traditional job hunting is the fact that you can get a very solid recommendation, and recommendations invariably improve hiring chances. It is one thing for you to tell some recruiter or a company CEO that you are the best fit for their marketing department. They don’t know you and they certainly don’t have to take your word for it. But imagine you have a friend whose wife is best friends with the senior VP for marketing at that first company. If she tells the VP you will make the perfect fit for a job opening they have, it’s an entirely different affair because all of us trust our friends. This person’s recommendation will add a lot of weight to your candidacy.   Finally, Ryan advises, keep your options open and be flexible in your job search. You don’t necessarily need focus on full-time openings only. In fact, you shouldn’t focus on them. Today’s labor market is much more diverse than ever before and sometimes a single consulting project can land you a full-time job. Every job hunter is a consultant, Ryan argues, so they should be ready to accept temporary gigs as consultants to grow their exposure and, of course, their network. Ryan says that in fact a lot of jobs never get advertised because the company hires a consultant doing some project that they are so happy with, they decide to offer the consultant the full-time job.   The key, says Ryan, is to take the reins of your career and hold them tight. That’s what CEOs do and that’s what everyone else looking for a job should do as well.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

7 Tips for Aspiring Inbound Marketers

  Digital marketing, particularly inbound, is certainly one of the hottest industries today, what with all the dizzyingly fast developments in IT and all things related (which is nowadays everything). So, inbound marketers are in demand. Naturally, after great demand comes great supply, not always of great quality, however. To improve your chances of getting an inbound marketing gig, here are seven tips provided by Hubspot’s Corey Eridon.   Create content.   Content creation is a major part of inbound marketing, so work on your blog, write in other people’s blogs, make infographics, record tutorials, basically get a content portfolio together. How else, after all, would your prospective employer know you are really capable of doing what you say you’re capable of doing?   Hang out everywhere.   LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, G+, the choice is extensive. If you’re an aspiring inbound marketer, you would certainly be aware of how important it is to be able to utilize all the opportunities social networks offer. Demonstrate this ability with your own social presence, which will speak much louder than anything you personally tell the potential employer.   Take part in communities.   An active social presence is very likely to bring you in touch with various communities based on your interests and ambitions. Be active there as well, whether it’s an online or an offline community. These communities are networking opportunities and networking opportunities often lead to job opportunities.   Invite analytics into your life.   Blogging is all very good but marketing is not just about writing. It’s more data-oriented than ever before because of the loads of data now available to marketers. Numbers are your friend, so get to know this friend and it will work for you.   Ditto Technology.   You should be clear by now that marketing today, particularly inbound marketing, requires a diverse set of skills, so some familiarity with things like content management systems, customer relationship management systems and perhaps even basic coding skills are always useful. In fact they are essential because every day brings something new in IT and it’s good idea to   Stay Up To Date with Developments.   Every day brings something new, says Eridon, and if you want to be an efficient and hence busy inbound marketer, you’ll need to keep tabs on latest developments, especially those that have to do with your profession. Read everything you can, keep an open mind and try to learn as much as you can, constantly, because marketing is just as dynamically developing as IT.   Demonstrate Your Skills in Your Job Application.   One of the best ways to demonstrate how good you are at what you do, create a unique, data-based, job application that showcases all your relevant skills. Eridon cites Hubspot employees who got their jobs by actually crafting an end-to-end inbound marketing campaign or creating a website dedicated to telling Hubspot why the creator should be hired. It’s original ideas like this, which reveal your skills and knowledge, that are the surest way to get hired by an inbound marketing company.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

Informational Interviews – A More Focused Job Hunt

  We tend to associate job hunting with sending out resumes to companies that offer vacancies in your field and networking. Informational interviews are a special kind of networking that can be very helpful for people who are looking for new career options, including a job in a whole new industry.   Informational interviews involve you as the interviewer and a person in a job that you are interested in as the interviewee. The purpose of the informational interview, as the name suggests, is gathering as much information as possible about the job, including daily routines, responsibilities, and any personal insight about the job. Here is how two careers experts recommend to conduct informational interviews.   First, select your interviewees, say Rosie Innes and Javier Munoz Parrondo from the Iese Business School. You can use professional networks such as LinkedIn, or alumni networks from the university you graduated. You can also use your personal contacts for recommendations. Innes and Parrondo advise that you do at least three interviews for a particular job, so you can filter the personal opinions out and focus on the common themes the interviewees identify.   Second, prepare your interview questions. Bear in mind that the reasonable time you can request from your prospective interviewees should not exceed half an hour, and devise a list of questions that would take as long to answer.   The next step is to learn more about the people you will be interviewing. Check their LinkedIn profiles or ask your contacts, if one such contact put you in touch with the interviewee. Also, research the company they work for, so your questions will be more specific and you could make references to that person’s own career.   Fourth, make sure your questions are open-ended, rather than requiring just a yes/no answer, to ensure you extract as much information as possible. Asking about what a typical day on the job involves, for instance, is a very good question. Another is enquiring about the skills and knowledge that would ensure excellent performance. A third good question will be about the ways in which people in the industry typically get their jobs.   Finally, structure your initial email/call to the interviewee carefully, including all the information they need to know. This includes a brief introduction (who you are, and how you were referred to this person), why you are writing to them, and a request for some of their time. Underline that you are looking for information only. Innes and Parrondo recommend that this email does not exceed 150 words.   Assuming the interview will be done live, rather than in writing, don’t forget to ask for further recommendations and references towards the end of it and after it’s over, send a special email to thank them for your time. The least you would get from an informational interview is, well, information, but it can also turn this person into a valuable contact and eventually land you a job.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago

10 Slips That Can Ruin Your Interview

  There are many mistakes a job candidate can make during an interview. A disheartening thought or at least it would be if there weren’t recruitment experts willing to share their advice with job hunters and warn them what to avoid. Some of these mistakes may be common sense to some but a surprising number of people still make them, so it seems only appropriate to review the most common and dangerous ones.   Being late.   Unless you get hit by a truck on the way to the interview or have a family emergency, there is no excuse for being late. The trouble is that even with a good excuse, it’s still not a good idea to be late, so reschedule if you can. Anyway, emergencies are not an everyday occurrence luckily, so being punctual is fully within your power.   Talking on your phone.   Good manners prescribe that when you talk to someone it is polite to give them your full attention. OK, so this may not be a must when you’re out with friends, but it is very true when you are at a job interview. Mute your phone, any calls can wait until after you’re done.   Swearing.   Maybe the interviewer has a very informal communication style involving profanities but don’t follow their lead on this one and keep a professional tone yourself. It’s true that a lot of job interview advice insists that you should follow the communication style of the interviewer but you can refrain from the profanities while being informal.   Criticizing.   Whatever you do, don’t speak ill of your former (or current) employer. This is unprofessional and it can directly affect your chances of getting the new job since the interviewer is very likely to contact your former company for a reference. What’s more, speaking badly of your former employer will tell the interviewer a lot about your own character, and not nice things, at that.   Asking about leave policies.   There is a time for everything but if you want to know what the vacation and sickness leave policies of the company are, the job interview is most emphatically not the time. It does not look good if you imply you’re planning to be absent from work before even being offered the job.   Responding with a cliche to the 5-year question.   You might believe that saying “Doing your job” in response to the question “Where do you see yourself in five years” is very original but it’s not. What’s more, it’s not even a good answer because it is basically a threat to the interviewer’s position. Use our other tips for the best answer to this question.   Failing to research the company.   “I looked at your website” needs to be followed by “I studied your latest financial report and found that…” or “I looked at your marketing strategy and identified…” In other words, just looking at the homepage of the company to find out what it does is insufficient if you want to ace the job interview. You need to conduct in-depth research.   Using jargon.   It might be OK to use some industry jargon but only if you are 110% sure that the interviewer is familiar with it. What’s a definite no is using jargon specific to your previous job. How is the interviewer supposed to know what you’re talking about if you use in-house abbreviations and phrases from your last place?   Suggesting you don’t like the dress code.   Dress code, parking space perks, or lunch break rules, all these are things that you may or may not agree with but the interview is not the time to share this disagreement. These go with the job, you’ll have to accept them. You can start complaining after you get the job, after all, can’t you? Mind, be careful who you complain to, if you really must.   Taking the selfish angle.   If the interviewer asks you which aspect of the job you expect to be happiest about, never answer with money, perks or anything else that you expect to gain from the job. Instead, talk about experience, skills, and learning new responsibilities.
Sharpen Team
2 years ago